Call for submissions: Long Walks pamphlet

Reclamations is currently accepting submissions for two projects that will be published online and printed as pamphlets to be distributed this spring.

The first pamphlet, tentatively entitled Long Walks, is a project we began partly in anticipation and support of the upcoming march for public education that will begin in Berkeley and will end, a mere eighty miles away, on the capitol grounds in Sacramento.

Traversing great distances on foot has long been part of the tradition of popular resistance. Perhaps one thinks of Gandhi’s 241-mile journey across the Indian subcontinent, which he undertook in 1930 in opposition to the British Salt Tax. Or perhaps one thinks back to 1960, when about six hundred Americans participated in the Selma-to-Montgomery March for voting rights. The first time the Montgomery-bound protestors set out, they were met with billy clubs and tear gas. A second attempt was made, and after making their way across highway and mead, they arrived at the Alabama state capitol. More recently, protestors from Occupy Wall Street set out on a 230-mile walk from New York City to Washington DC. And last summer, a “walk to work” campaign was started in Uganda, as a way to demonstrate against rising fuel prices and poor living conditions.

Reclamations invites you to submit work that reflects on walking as a political and cultural practice. Artwork and/or short pieces of writing are welcome. For the latter, submissions should be somewhere in the vicinity of 1250 words.

Questions and topics may include, but are not limited to the following:

  • How does the simple activity of putting one foot in front of the other become a form of political praxis?
  • What might it mean to walk long distances, especially in a context in which walking is a mode of transport that many consider inefficient or outmoded?
  • Walking as collective action
  • Walking and the reclamation of public spaces, particularly the street, the highway
  • Reflections on historical walks or marches
  • The long walk as a response to the privatization of public education
  • Commentary or analysis of the California walk in March
  • Walking as slow-speed transit
  • The political walk as it may resonate with other cultural practices, like the pilgrimage or the procession
  • Walking as the crossing urban, suburban, and country spaces
  • Walking in the context of other forms of political action, like the strike or the occupation
  • What might distinguish the politically motivated walk from perambulation, itinerancy, the promenade, the idling of a wanderer?
  • Walking as a form of labor
  • Why walk?
  • Walking-as-a-fuck-you-to-great-injustice
  • Walk-onomics

Work received and accepted before February 27th will be made available to those embarking on the four-day journey to Sacramento. Submissions will also be accepted through April 1, and all accepted contributions will be gathered and printed in the second edition of Long Walks.

Email submissions to reclamations@gmail.com. Other queries should be directed to michellety2@gmail.com.

Discussion4 Comments Category Uncategorized

4 Responses to Call for submissions: Long Walks pamphlet

  1. Why Strike; Why March; Why Occupy? « CaliCal

  2. March 1-5 Actions – Why Strike, Why March, Why Occupy? | Occupy Cal

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